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Now showing at Bussey Building/ The CLF Art Cafe 133,Rye Lane,Peckham,London,London SE15 4ST 020 7732 5275

  • Breakfast At Tiffany's
  • Casablanca
  • The Grand Budapest Hotel

Breakfast At Tiffany's 4 stars

movie title

Holly Golightly is a desperately lonely socialite living in New York, who is searching rather forlornly for a rich, older husband. Her restrictive outlook on life is forever changed when she meets her new neighbour Paul Varjak, an aspiring author and kept man involved in an adulterous affair with a wealthy older woman. Holly and Paul become firm friends, but their feelings gradually turn to affection and love.

  • GenreAdaptation, Classic, Romance
  • CastAudrey Hepburn, George Peppard, Patricia Neal, Buddy Ebsen.
  • DirectorBlake Edwards.
  • WriterGeorge Axelrod.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration114 mins
  • Official site
  • Release16/02/2001 (selected cinemas); 21/01/2011 (selected cinemas)

Widely regarded as one of Audrey Hepburn's finest moments, Blake Edwards's enduring popular romantic comedy swoons back onto the big screen, 50 years after its original theatrical release. Holly Golightly (Hepburn) is a desperately lonely socialite living in New York, who is searching rather forlornly for a rich, older husband to support herself and her brother. Her restrictive outlook on life is forever changed when she meets her new neighbour Paul Varjak (George Peppard), an aspiring author and kept man involved in an adulterous affair with a wealthy older woman (Patricia Neal). Holly and Paul become firm friends, introducing one another to their particular worlds, but their feelings gradually turn to affection and love. Penned by George Axelrod from Truman Capote's novel, Breakfast At Tiffany's is a charming romantic comedy, blessed with Henry Mancini's airy musical score (including the unforgettable "Moon River" written in collaboration with Johnny Mercer) and Givenchy's era-defining fashions. Hepburn is mesmerising, playing Holly initially as an adorable airhead, but gradually dismantling her defences to reveal the pain and self-doubt which have compelled the poor girl to seek refuge in gaudy excess. The actress looks effortlessly stylish, and is complimented by Peppard's solid turn. The pair are electric on screen together.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Thursday 25th September 2014

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Casablanca 5 stars

Re-release of the classic 1942 wartime romance with one of cinema's most memorable farewells. American expatriate Rick Blaine runs a cafe in the centre of town, where Europeans often come to obtain exit visas to escape the Nazis. When old flame Ilsa and her husband, resistance leader Victor Laszlo, turn up in Casablanca, Rick faces an agonising moral dilemma: help the woman he loves and lose her forever, or betray her husband to the Germans.

  • GenreAdaptation, Classic, Drama, Romance
  • CastHumphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Paul Henreid, Peter Lorre, Conrad Veidt, Sydney Greenstreet, Claude Rains.
  • DirectorMichael Curtiz.
  • WriterJulius J Epstein, Philip G Epstein, Howard Koch.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration102 mins
  • Official site
  • Release14/02/2007 (selected cinemas); 10/02/2012 (selected cinemas)

Re-release of Michael Curtiz's classic 1942 wartime romance with one of cinema's most memorable farewells. Humphrey Bogart stars as American expatriate Rick Blaine, who runs a cafe in the centre of town, where Europeans often come to obtain exit visas to escape the Nazis. When old flame Ilsa (Ingrid Bergman) and her husband, resistance leader Victor Laszlo (Paul Henreid), turn up in Casablanca, Rick faces an agonising moral dilemma: help the woman he loves and lose her forever, or betray her husband to the Germans.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Tuesday 23rd September 2014

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The Grand Budapest Hotel 5 stars

movie title

Zero Moustafa secures a coveted position as lobby boy at one of Europe's most celebrated establishments, the Grand Budapest Hotel, working underneath legendary concierge Gustave H. He lavishes physical and emotional affection on the customers, including ageing matriarch Madame D. When she perishes in suspicious circumstances and leaves a priceless Renaissance painting entitled Boy With Apple to Gustave in her will, grief-stricken relatives plot to bring down the concierge.

  • GenreAction, Comedy, Drama, Historical/Period, Romance
  • CastF Murray Abraham, Edward Norton, Ralph Fiennes, Willem Dafoe, Adrien Brody, Jeff Goldblum, Mathieu Amalric, Owen Wilson, Jason Schwartzman, Harvey Keitel, Saoirse Ronan, Lea Seydoux, Tilda Swinton, Jude Law, Tom Wilkinson, Tony Revolori, Bill Murray.
  • DirectorWes Anderson.
  • WriterWes Anderson.
  • CountryUS/Ger
  • Duration100 mins
  • Official sitewww.grandbudapesthotel.com
  • Release07/03/2014

When Wes Anderson is good, he's very good - dare I say it, brilliant - and when he's occasionally off-key, the Texan writer-director still puts other filmmakers in the shade. The Grand Budapest Hotel is a tour-de-force of invention and creativity that leaves no narrative stone unturned in its quest for laughs and heartfelt emotion.

Anderson is in sparkling form, tracing the history of the titular establishment from 1932 to the present day through the eyes of two lovers, who become embroiled in a madcap crime caper involving a stolen painting.

It's a brilliantly bonkers ensemble comedy from a filmmaker who marries quirky production design with eccentric characters and wry humour, yet still manages to find a nub of humanity in every outlandish situation.

Anderson marshals an incredible cast including regular collaborators Owen Wilson, Jason Schwartzman and Bill Murray, plus he teases out an uproarious and energetic performance from Ralph Fiennes as the suave protagonist at the centre of the mystery.

The British actor's comic timing is impeccable. Nightmares conjured by his portrayals of Amon Goeth in Schindler's List or Voldemort in the Harry Potter saga are banished forever.

A neat framing device introduces Zero Moustafa (Tony Tevolori), who secures a coveted position as lobby boy at one of eastern Europe's celebrated establishments, the Grand Budapest Hotel in the Republic of Zubrowka. Zero works under legendary concierge Gustave H (Fiennes), who the lobby boy fondly remembers as "the most liberally perfumed man I've ever met".

Clients, especially older women, are putty in Gustave's well-manicured hands and he lavishes them with affection, including ageing matriarch Madame D (Tilda Swinton).

When she perishes in suspicious circumstances and leaves a priceless Renaissance painting entitled Boy With Apple to Gustave in her will, grief-stricken relatives including Madame's greedy son Dmitri (Adrien Brody) plot the concierge's downfall.

The finger of suspicion for Madame D's demise points at Gustave and he goes on the run with wily police chief Henckels (Edward Norton) and Dmitri's sadistic henchman (Willem Dafoe) in hot pursuit.

With the continent changing at frightening speed, Gustave and accomplice Zero attempt to outwit their pursuers and prove the concierge's innocence, aided by a pretty baker's assistant called Agatha (Saoirse Ronan).

The Grand Budapest Hotel offers audiences a luxurious five-star stay inside Anderson's vision. Every frame is beautifully crafted, set to a jaunty score by composer Alexandre Desplat.

If Fiennes is a revelation in a rare comedic role, supporting performances are equally memorable including Swinton's cranky grand dame and Jeff Goldblum's ill-fated lawyer.

Bookmarked into five chapters, the narrative twists and turns at delirious speed. "The plot thickens, so they say. Why? Is it a soup metaphor?" wonders Gustave aloud as the truth about Madame D's death comes into focus - and we lap up every sublime soupy metaphor with gusto.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Wednesday 24th September 2014

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