Croydon school to feature in BBC documentary Tough Young Teachers

Croydon Guardian: Oxford graduate Charles Wallendahl learned his teaching skills at Archbishop Lanfranc school (Picture: BBC) Oxford graduate Charles Wallendahl learned his teaching skills at Archbishop Lanfranc school (Picture: BBC)

A Croydon school features in a fly on the wall documentary which lifts the lid on life for trainee teachers.

Archbishop Lanfranc School, in Thornton Heath, is one of the secondary schools involved in the six part BBC documentary Tough Young Teachers.

The series follows trainee teachers on the Teach First scheme, a charity which looks to put bright young graduates in schools where many pupils are from ‘low income communities’.

Teachers get six weeks training before they are thrust into the hustle and bustle of the classroom.

Lanfranc has two teachers who feature in the series.

Charles Wallendahl, who studied religious education at Oxford University and is now an RE teacher, and geography graduate Chloe Shaw are both learning their trade at the secondary school, which was classed as inadequate in its latest Ofsted inspection.

Mr Wallendahl, 23, who also studied at the prestigious Charterhouse school, is shown having to deal with all sorts of issues including unruly teenagers.

Archbishop Lanfranc has a high proportion of students where English is not their first language, with many students coming from minority ethnic groups.

In one of his first lessons, Mr Wallendahl taught a student who had just arrived from central Africa and was unable to speak English so he used Google Translate to communicate with the girl.

David Clark, head teacher at Lanfranc, said the school has been involved with Teach First for more than 10 years which was one of the main contributory factors of being invited to take part in the documentary.

He said both Mr Wallendahl and Miss Shaw have grown into very good teachers as part of the scheme.

But Mr Clark added he was personally disappointed with the episodes he had seen, saying there was not as much focus on the actual development of the teachers.

He said: "My reaction to the series is that it was not the series we thought they were going to produce and that it fails to shed any realistic light on what the Teach First programme is about.

“I think it is a bit of a failed opportunity really.

“It does not show the work that is done by schools to ensure that Teach First trainees make the sort of progress we want to see them make.

“It is not something that happens by accident. It neglects the routine things and the mundane things that happen. It focuses too much on having public appeal.”

 

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Comments (6)

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8:15pm Tue 7 Jan 14

motomoto says...

Good luck to the new teachers but what would go a very long way in helping to maintain strict discipline would be to bring the cane back.......six hard lashes with the cane would be enough to put any "gangster rap rude boy rubbish" firmly in their place.
Any bloke who attended ingram high school in thornton heath during the 1980's will remember the cane being enforced and used by geography teacher mr smith !
Good luck to the new teachers but what would go a very long way in helping to maintain strict discipline would be to bring the cane back.......six hard lashes with the cane would be enough to put any "gangster rap rude boy rubbish" firmly in their place. Any bloke who attended ingram high school in thornton heath during the 1980's will remember the cane being enforced and used by geography teacher mr smith ! motomoto

9:43pm Tue 7 Jan 14

ANNE GILES says...

motomoto wrote:
Good luck to the new teachers but what would go a very long way in helping to maintain strict discipline would be to bring the cane back.......six hard lashes with the cane would be enough to put any "gangster rap rude boy rubbish" firmly in their place.
Any bloke who attended ingram high school in thornton heath during the 1980's will remember the cane being enforced and used by geography teacher mr smith !
That would be abuse and it teaches that violence is O.K. It is not.
[quote][p][bold]motomoto[/bold] wrote: Good luck to the new teachers but what would go a very long way in helping to maintain strict discipline would be to bring the cane back.......six hard lashes with the cane would be enough to put any "gangster rap rude boy rubbish" firmly in their place. Any bloke who attended ingram high school in thornton heath during the 1980's will remember the cane being enforced and used by geography teacher mr smith ![/p][/quote]That would be abuse and it teaches that violence is O.K. It is not. ANNE GILES

10:03pm Tue 7 Jan 14

Kier001 says...

ANNE GILES wrote:
motomoto wrote:
Good luck to the new teachers but what would go a very long way in helping to maintain strict discipline would be to bring the cane back.......six hard lashes with the cane would be enough to put any "gangster rap rude boy rubbish" firmly in their place.
Any bloke who attended ingram high school in thornton heath during the 1980's will remember the cane being enforced and used by geography teacher mr smith !
That would be abuse and it teaches that violence is O.K. It is not.
Oh well, I was caned at school. It didn't do me any good whatsoever. However, it did put loads of kids off misbehaving. Not saying that caning is the answer but discipline is a joke in many schools where too many kids and their parents know all about their rights and precious little about their responsibilities. Incidentally, I wonder how many adults in their 40s and 50s were caned at school but still managed to turn out into well balanced, confident and hard working adults. Probably the vast majority of them I guess. Just a thought.......
[quote][p][bold]ANNE GILES[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]motomoto[/bold] wrote: Good luck to the new teachers but what would go a very long way in helping to maintain strict discipline would be to bring the cane back.......six hard lashes with the cane would be enough to put any "gangster rap rude boy rubbish" firmly in their place. Any bloke who attended ingram high school in thornton heath during the 1980's will remember the cane being enforced and used by geography teacher mr smith ![/p][/quote]That would be abuse and it teaches that violence is O.K. It is not.[/p][/quote]Oh well, I was caned at school. It didn't do me any good whatsoever. However, it did put loads of kids off misbehaving. Not saying that caning is the answer but discipline is a joke in many schools where too many kids and their parents know all about their rights and precious little about their responsibilities. Incidentally, I wonder how many adults in their 40s and 50s were caned at school but still managed to turn out into well balanced, confident and hard working adults. Probably the vast majority of them I guess. Just a thought....... Kier001

9:37pm Wed 8 Jan 14

motomoto says...

@ anne giles.....back in the 80's there was much much less pupils being expelled from schools.......much much less teachers being assaulted and children spoke a lot better than they do now.
Since the removal of the cane pupil expulsions have gone through the roof......assaults on teaching staff have gone through the roof.
The presence of the cane encourages pupils to act and behave in a good manner and those who act and behave in a good manner have nothing to fear.
To punish a pupil with the cane is to instill discipline and authority upon what is otherwise an unruly child......a punishment is not supposed to be pleasant......it is there to serve a purpose and in my opinion to cane an unruly and disruptive child IS NOT abuse !
@ anne giles.....back in the 80's there was much much less pupils being expelled from schools.......much much less teachers being assaulted and children spoke a lot better than they do now. Since the removal of the cane pupil expulsions have gone through the roof......assaults on teaching staff have gone through the roof. The presence of the cane encourages pupils to act and behave in a good manner and those who act and behave in a good manner have nothing to fear. To punish a pupil with the cane is to instill discipline and authority upon what is otherwise an unruly child......a punishment is not supposed to be pleasant......it is there to serve a purpose and in my opinion to cane an unruly and disruptive child IS NOT abuse ! motomoto

1:51pm Thu 9 Jan 14

PurleyDrinker48 says...

Obviously there are going to be arguments in this column either in support of corporal punishment or people who abhore it. As somebody who went to the infamous Purley High School for Boys back in the late 70s/very start of the early 80s, whatever people said about our headmaster then (yes - in the national press!), the fact that he would threaten to use the cane if we seriously misbehaved, never in any way affected how we are as adults and in fact I feel we have our headmaster to thank for developing us into good, hard-working adult citizens of Croydon!
Obviously there are going to be arguments in this column either in support of corporal punishment or people who abhore it. As somebody who went to the infamous Purley High School for Boys back in the late 70s/very start of the early 80s, whatever people said about our headmaster then (yes - in the national press!), the fact that he would threaten to use the cane if we seriously misbehaved, never in any way affected how we are as adults and in fact I feel we have our headmaster to thank for developing us into good, hard-working adult citizens of Croydon! PurleyDrinker48

2:21pm Sat 11 Jan 14

iconoclastic says...

Given that Lanfranc has been involved with Teach First for ten years why has Ofsted put the school into Special Measures and deemed the school as inadequate?
Not much impact or return on tax payers money here! I suggest we look at payment by results for the CEO of Teach First!
Given that Lanfranc has been involved with Teach First for ten years why has Ofsted put the school into Special Measures and deemed the school as inadequate? Not much impact or return on tax payers money here! I suggest we look at payment by results for the CEO of Teach First! iconoclastic

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