Government departments could move to Croydon in 'mini Whitehall' plan

Ruskin Square is one of the proposed sites for the mini Whitehall

Ruskin Square is one of the proposed sites for the mini Whitehall

First published in News
Last updated
Croydon Guardian: Photograph of the Author by , Chief Reporter

Croydon could become home to a "mini Whitehall" with more Government departments moving to the town, it has been announced today.

The Government is considering relocating several of its offices to the town centre and creating a ‘hub’ with up to 10 local and central government services based on the same site.

Sites under consideration for the mini Whitehall include Ruskin Square and West Croydon Interchange.

The council will now be given funding and training from the Government Property Unit and Local Government Association to carry out a feasibility study.

This will assess the benefits and pitfalls of moving the civil servants already working in Croydon – for the Home Office and the Land Registry – into modern purpose built offices as part of the regeneration of the town centre.

It comes after the news that Croydon has been chosen as one of 20 local authorities across the country to become part of the government’s One Public Estate programme, a property sharing scheme between central and local government.

Croydon Council said if the hub goes ahead it will create significant economic growth and generate income from moving the existing civil service departments into fit for purpose, modern and efficient buildings.

And it believes alongside Westfield/Hammerson partnership’s plans to redevelop the Whitgift Centre, the proposed site would provide another boost to the regeneration of the town centre.

Cabinet member for economic development Councillor Toni Letts said: “We are on the brink of seeing massive regeneration in Croydon.

“We have future growth plans of Olympic-sized proportions, which will see the creation of 16,500 more jobs, the building of 9,500 new homes, and the redevelopment of our retail centre by Westfield and Hammerson.

“These are really exciting times and these ambitious proposals for a civil service hub will only enhance Croydon’s reputation as a great place to work, live and visit.”

Comments (7)

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4:45pm Thu 7 Aug 14

ummagumma says...

Hang on a minute, is it April's fool's day? A councillor named Toni LETTS is to lease out buildings in Croydon to Governmental Departments from Whitehall! A word of advice to Toni LETTS, please don't rent the old library building in New Addington to anybody that has any link with Health and Safety because according to (ex) councillor's Pollard, Pearson and Bashford, it should have fallen down by now! You couldn't make it up....
Hang on a minute, is it April's fool's day? A councillor named Toni LETTS is to lease out buildings in Croydon to Governmental Departments from Whitehall! A word of advice to Toni LETTS, please don't rent the old library building in New Addington to anybody that has any link with Health and Safety because according to (ex) councillor's Pollard, Pearson and Bashford, it should have fallen down by now! You couldn't make it up.... ummagumma
  • Score: -3

12:30pm Sat 9 Aug 14

Mr Strings says...

Surely this would be a good thing? Especially if they occupy a decent space in Interchange (previously Prospect West BT building in West Croydon), which has so far stood completely empty since the impressive refurb last year...
Surely this would be a good thing? Especially if they occupy a decent space in Interchange (previously Prospect West BT building in West Croydon), which has so far stood completely empty since the impressive refurb last year... Mr Strings
  • Score: 2

12:44pm Sat 9 Aug 14

ummagumma says...

Mr Strings, you have never encountered irony, have you?
Mr Strings, you have never encountered irony, have you? ummagumma
  • Score: 2

1:27pm Sat 9 Aug 14

Mr Strings says...

ummagumma wrote:
Mr Strings, you have never encountered irony, have you?
If you mean when everyone moans that no progress is made in an area, then also moans when positive steps are taken, then yes I'd say I've encountered it. Just trying to look forward...
[quote][p][bold]ummagumma[/bold] wrote: Mr Strings, you have never encountered irony, have you?[/p][/quote]If you mean when everyone moans that no progress is made in an area, then also moans when positive steps are taken, then yes I'd say I've encountered it. Just trying to look forward... Mr Strings
  • Score: 0

11:01am Sun 10 Aug 14

ummagumma says...

Irony, sarcasm, satire indicate mockery of something or someone. The essential feature of irony is the indirect presentation of a contradiction between an action or expression and the context in which it occurs. In the figure of speech, emphasis is placed on the opposition between the literal and intended meaning of a statement; one thing is said and its opposite implied, as in the comment, “Beautiful weather, isn't it?” made when it is raining or nasty. Ironic literature exploits, in addition to the rhetorical figure, such devices as character development, situation, and plot to stress the paradoxical nature of reality or the contrast between an ideal and actual condition, set of circumstances, etc., frequently in such a way as to stress the absurdity present in the contradiction between substance and form. Irony differs from sarcasm in greater subtlety and wit. In sarcasm ridicule or mockery is used harshly, often crudely and contemptuously, for destructive purposes. It may be used in an indirect manner, and have the form of irony, as in “What a fine musician you turned out to be!” or it may be used in the form of a direct statement, “You couldn't play one piece correctly if you had two assistants.” The distinctive quality of sarcasm is present in the spoken word and manifested chiefly by vocal inflection, whereas satire and irony, arising originally as literary and rhetorical forms, are exhibited in the organization or structuring of either language or literary material. Satire usually implies the use of irony or sarcasm for censorious or critical purposes and is often directed at public figures or institutions, conventional behavior, political situations, etc. Geddit?
The person that was assigned to lease out the buildings was Toni LETTS (as in a letting agency). The old library in New Addington was moved to the Calat centre because councillors Pollard, Pearson and Bashford insisted that the building was unsafe and about to fall down, yet Croydon council still let it out to anybody that is willing to pay. Chill out everybody!
Finally, why does the Croydon Guardian use an American spellchecker where the word CENTRE doesn't exist!
Irony, sarcasm, satire indicate mockery of something or someone. The essential feature of irony is the indirect presentation of a contradiction between an action or expression and the context in which it occurs. In the figure of speech, emphasis is placed on the opposition between the literal and intended meaning of a statement; one thing is said and its opposite implied, as in the comment, “Beautiful weather, isn't it?” made when it is raining or nasty. Ironic literature exploits, in addition to the rhetorical figure, such devices as character development, situation, and plot to stress the paradoxical nature of reality or the contrast between an ideal and actual condition, set of circumstances, etc., frequently in such a way as to stress the absurdity present in the contradiction between substance and form. Irony differs from sarcasm in greater subtlety and wit. In sarcasm ridicule or mockery is used harshly, often crudely and contemptuously, for destructive purposes. It may be used in an indirect manner, and have the form of irony, as in “What a fine musician you turned out to be!” or it may be used in the form of a direct statement, “You couldn't play one piece correctly if you had two assistants.” The distinctive quality of sarcasm is present in the spoken word and manifested chiefly by vocal inflection, whereas satire and irony, arising originally as literary and rhetorical forms, are exhibited in the organization or structuring of either language or literary material. Satire usually implies the use of irony or sarcasm for censorious or critical purposes and is often directed at public figures or institutions, conventional behavior, political situations, etc. Geddit? The person that was assigned to lease out the buildings was Toni LETTS (as in a letting agency). The old library in New Addington was moved to the Calat centre because councillors Pollard, Pearson and Bashford insisted that the building was unsafe and about to fall down, yet Croydon council still let it out to anybody that is willing to pay. Chill out everybody! Finally, why does the Croydon Guardian use an American spellchecker where the word CENTRE doesn't exist! ummagumma
  • Score: -2

11:53am Sun 10 Aug 14

Mr Strings says...

ummagumma wrote:
Irony, sarcasm, satire indicate mockery of something or someone. The essential feature of irony is the indirect presentation of a contradiction between an action or expression and the context in which it occurs. In the figure of speech, emphasis is placed on the opposition between the literal and intended meaning of a statement; one thing is said and its opposite implied, as in the comment, “Beautiful weather, isn't it?” made when it is raining or nasty. Ironic literature exploits, in addition to the rhetorical figure, such devices as character development, situation, and plot to stress the paradoxical nature of reality or the contrast between an ideal and actual condition, set of circumstances, etc., frequently in such a way as to stress the absurdity present in the contradiction between substance and form. Irony differs from sarcasm in greater subtlety and wit. In sarcasm ridicule or mockery is used harshly, often crudely and contemptuously, for destructive purposes. It may be used in an indirect manner, and have the form of irony, as in “What a fine musician you turned out to be!” or it may be used in the form of a direct statement, “You couldn't play one piece correctly if you had two assistants.” The distinctive quality of sarcasm is present in the spoken word and manifested chiefly by vocal inflection, whereas satire and irony, arising originally as literary and rhetorical forms, are exhibited in the organization or structuring of either language or literary material. Satire usually implies the use of irony or sarcasm for censorious or critical purposes and is often directed at public figures or institutions, conventional behavior, political situations, etc. Geddit?
The person that was assigned to lease out the buildings was Toni LETTS (as in a letting agency). The old library in New Addington was moved to the Calat centre because councillors Pollard, Pearson and Bashford insisted that the building was unsafe and about to fall down, yet Croydon council still let it out to anybody that is willing to pay. Chill out everybody!
Finally, why does the Croydon Guardian use an American spellchecker where the word CENTRE doesn't exist!
Good grief, calm down dear.
[quote][p][bold]ummagumma[/bold] wrote: Irony, sarcasm, satire indicate mockery of something or someone. The essential feature of irony is the indirect presentation of a contradiction between an action or expression and the context in which it occurs. In the figure of speech, emphasis is placed on the opposition between the literal and intended meaning of a statement; one thing is said and its opposite implied, as in the comment, “Beautiful weather, isn't it?” made when it is raining or nasty. Ironic literature exploits, in addition to the rhetorical figure, such devices as character development, situation, and plot to stress the paradoxical nature of reality or the contrast between an ideal and actual condition, set of circumstances, etc., frequently in such a way as to stress the absurdity present in the contradiction between substance and form. Irony differs from sarcasm in greater subtlety and wit. In sarcasm ridicule or mockery is used harshly, often crudely and contemptuously, for destructive purposes. It may be used in an indirect manner, and have the form of irony, as in “What a fine musician you turned out to be!” or it may be used in the form of a direct statement, “You couldn't play one piece correctly if you had two assistants.” The distinctive quality of sarcasm is present in the spoken word and manifested chiefly by vocal inflection, whereas satire and irony, arising originally as literary and rhetorical forms, are exhibited in the organization or structuring of either language or literary material. Satire usually implies the use of irony or sarcasm for censorious or critical purposes and is often directed at public figures or institutions, conventional behavior, political situations, etc. Geddit? The person that was assigned to lease out the buildings was Toni LETTS (as in a letting agency). The old library in New Addington was moved to the Calat centre because councillors Pollard, Pearson and Bashford insisted that the building was unsafe and about to fall down, yet Croydon council still let it out to anybody that is willing to pay. Chill out everybody! Finally, why does the Croydon Guardian use an American spellchecker where the word CENTRE doesn't exist![/p][/quote]Good grief, calm down dear. Mr Strings
  • Score: -1

1:02pm Sun 10 Aug 14

ummagumma says...

Mr Strings, once again, my irony is wasted!
Mr Strings, once again, my irony is wasted! ummagumma
  • Score: 1

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