Snapper quizzed on anti-terror law in Croydon

First published in News by

A private detective was quizzed by cops under anti-terror laws for snapping a picture of a council van parked on double yellow lines.

On May 19, Jorge Salgado-Reyes was outside his office in Katharine Street, Croydon, with a colleague when he saw the Croydon Council enforcement van parked on double yellow lines.

Mr Salgado-Reyes then began taking photographs of the vehicle because the men inside seemed to be just “kicking back” rather than on official business.

It was then that a PCSO came over and asked him what he was doing.

He told the PCSO that it was nothing to do with her and he was fully entitled to be taking pictures.

He claims the PCSO then told him he could be stopped from taking the photos under the Prevention of Terrorism Act.

But, unknown to the over-zealous PCSO the colleague he was standing with was a solicitor and they just happened to be stood directly outside their office.

She then asked them if they lived in the area or worked here.

Mr Salgado-Reyes said: “I told her we did indeed work in Croydon and pointed to the sign above our heads, which read Mansouri and son solicitors.

“It was brilliant, she did a double take at the sign and then her whole approach changed. She became a lot more friendly and stayed and had a chat with us for a couple of minutes.

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“I had already told her what I was doing was not unlawful but when she tried to say we could be arrested under the Prevention of Terrorism Act I wasn't going to take that.

“Fair enough if the council workers had been on official business but they were just kicking back.

“For too long the local councils have had far too much power and it is time to take it back.

“Everyone should have to adhere to the same rules.”

Comments (3)

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4:58pm Mon 31 May 10

Oudinot says...

This is increasingly the way things have been going in Britain, with civil liberties attacked, and people told "if you've nothing to hide you've nothing to worry about". Well, eventually, what happens is that people with nothing to hide have plenty to worry about-because they live in a Police State where one is presumed guilty and has to prove your innocence.

Just a silly mistake? A storm in a teacup?
No. Very serious erosion of our freedoms.
This is increasingly the way things have been going in Britain, with civil liberties attacked, and people told "if you've nothing to hide you've nothing to worry about". Well, eventually, what happens is that people with nothing to hide have plenty to worry about-because they live in a Police State where one is presumed guilty and has to prove your innocence. Just a silly mistake? A storm in a teacup? No. Very serious erosion of our freedoms. Oudinot
  • Score: 0

10:06am Wed 2 Jun 10

Angela M says...

So now we can't take any photos? Some people have been reprimanded for photographing their own children in public parks, and now apparently we can't take pictures of illegally parked council vehicles.

Are the council above the law?

Anyway, I thought the yellow lines were there for safety reasons?
So now we can't take any photos? Some people have been reprimanded for photographing their own children in public parks, and now apparently we can't take pictures of illegally parked council vehicles. Are the council above the law? Anyway, I thought the yellow lines were there for safety reasons? Angela M
  • Score: 0

9:52pm Wed 2 Jun 10

mcblount says...

We can take photographs. The PCSO was wrong. I photographed the new London Overground trains today.
We can take photographs. The PCSO was wrong. I photographed the new London Overground trains today. mcblount
  • Score: 0

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